Vaccinations Required

Dog Vaccinations              Feline Vaccinations
D,H,L,P,P                                               FVRC-P
            Rabies                                              Feline Leukemia Virus
Bordetella (canine cough)                                                          Feline Rabies

What You Should Know About Vaccinations

Cats and dogs, like humans, can be protected by vaccination against many serious and potentially fatal diseases caused by bacteria and viruses. While your veterinarian is your best source of information about all animal health matters, including vaccination, this web page will answer some of the more general questions you might have about vaccinations and immunizations.

Canine Diseases Requiring Vaccinations

Canine Distemper ...is a highly contagious viral disease transmitted by direct or indirect contact with the discharges    from an infected dog's eyes and nose. A healthy dog does not need to come in direct contact with an infected dog, because the virus can be carried by air currents and inanimate objects. Early signs of canine distemper are similar to those of a severe cold and often go unrecognized by the pet owner. The respiratory problems may be accompanied by vomiting and diarrhea. A  nervous system disorder may also develop. The death rate from canine distemper is greater than 50% in adult dogs and much higher in puppies. Even if the dog survives, distemper can cause permanent damage to a dog's nervous system, sense of smell, hearing and sight. Partial or total paralysis is not uncommon.

Infectious Canine Hepatitis...is caused by a virus that can infect many tissues, but usually attacks the liver causing hepatitis. In some instances, a whiteness or cloudiness of the eye may accompany the disease. Another strain of the same virus can cause respiratory tract infections. These viruses are transmitted by contact with objects that have been contaminated with the urine from infected dogs. Infectious Canine Hepatitis is different from human hepatitis.

Canine Leptospirosis...is a bacterial disease that impairs renal (kidney) function and may result in kidney failure. Clinical signs include vomiting, impaired vision, and convulsions. The disease is transmitted by contact with the urine of infected animals or by contact with objects that have been contaminated with the urine of infected animals

Canine Parvovirus ...is a serious problem, due to the highly resistant nature of the virus, CPV can withstand extreme temperature changes, and exposure to most disinfectants. The source of the infection is usually dog feces which can contaminate cages, shoes, and can be carried on the feet and hair of infected animals. This virus attacks the intestinal tract, white blood cells and heart muscle. Clinical signs include vomiting, severe diarrhea, accompanied by a loss of appetite, depression, and high fever. Most deaths occur within 48 to 72 hours after the onset of clinical signs. Pups, less than 3 months of age, can experience an inflammation of the heart (myocarditis). Infected pups may act depressed, collapse gasping for breath, and death may follow immediately. Pups that survive are likely to have permanently damaged hearts.

Canine Parainfluenza...is caused by a virus which produces a mild respiratory tract infection. It is often associated with other respiratory tract viruses. In combination these viruses are usually transmitted by contact with the nasal secretions of infected dogs. The vaccine to protect against this disease may be combined with other vaccines to offer broader protection.

Canine Rabies... A fatal infection of the central nervous system that affects all mammals, especially raccoons, bats, skunks, foxes, domestic dogs and cats, and humans. Since rabies poses a serious public health threat, it is imperative that your puppy be vaccinated. Most states require it.

Canine Bordetellosis...is caused by bacterium Bordetella bronchiseptica which is present in the respiratory tracts of     many animals. It is a primary cause of the severe chronic cough, tracheobronchitis, (kennel cough). In addition to the cough, some dogs develop a purulent nasal discharge. Transmission most frequently occurs by contact with the nasal secretions of infected dogs. Vaccination is usually accomplished by the use of nasal spray. There are several effective schedules and methods for administering the vaccine. Your veterinarian will establish a schedule that is best for your dog.
 
 



Feline Diseases Requiring Vaccinations

Feline Panleukopenia...(also known as feline infectious enteritis and feline distemper) is caused by a resistant virus that may remain infectious for more than a year at room temperature on inanimate objects. It is transmitted through blood, urine, feces, and nasal secretions, and even by fleas from infected cats. The disease destroys many of the cat's white blood cells. The disease is fatal for 50% to 70% of the cats that have it. Cats with feline panleukopenia seem lethargic, vomit, have a high fever, and are dehydrated. Sickness may go on for 3 to 4 days after the first signs are noticed and before death occurs. Immunity to the disease can be developed by a series of vaccinations administered when the cat is still a kitten followed by annual boosters.

Feline Viral Rhinotracheitis, Feline Calicivirus and Feline Pneumonitis...are diseases of the respiratory tract of cats. Infected animals are highly contagious to other cats and may show either acute or chronic respiratory signs.

Feline Leukemia Virus...is a usually fatal disease affecting the cat's immune system. This increases susceptibility to other disease as well as leukemia. Signs of feline leukemia virus include weight loss, recurring or chronic illness, lethargy, fever, diarrhea, unusual breathing patterns, and a yellow color around the mouth and the whites of the eyes. A blood test is necessary to prove that the feline leukemia virus is present. Until recently, there was no vaccine available to fight this usually fatal disease. A newly developed inactivated virus vaccine can protect cats.

Feline Rabies... A fatal infection of the central nervous system that affects all mammals, especially raccoons, bats, skunks, foxes, domestic dogs and cats, and humans. Since rabies poses a serious public health threat, it is imperative that your puppy be vaccinated. Most states require it.

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